Not missing Windows after trying Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix

Given that I grew up as a power DOS/Windows user, I often have gripes about how frustrating Linux is and they were almost never ready for people who just want to get common things done by intuitively guessing where the feature is (therefore having to RTFM or search the web for answers).

I deal with HP/Agilent/Keysight instruments a lot and appreciated their effort put on user experience (UX) design. It’s not that user who’s stupid if they have to dig through 5+ levels of menu buttons to measure a Vpp (peak to peak voltage) and the software aren’t smart enough to default to the only channel in use. That’s what Tektronix did to their nasty user interface and raised a generation of Stockholm Syndrome patients who keep buying Tek because they are traumatized by the steep learning curve and would rather walk on broken glass than having to learn a new interface from another vendor (that’s called vendor lock in).

I certainly appreciate Cinnamon desktop environment (came with Linux mint) designers willing to not insist on the ‘right way of doing things’ and follow a path that’s most intuitive for users coming from a Windows background.

The last time I used Linux Mint was 19. There’s still quite a lot of rough edges. Some services got stuck (time-outs) right out of the box and systemd went through slowly. It’s just not fast and responsive. When I tried it again when Mint 20.1 was released, my old i3 computer boots to the GUI in 5 seconds and I was hell of impressed. The icons and menus are also now sized balanced proportions like Windows (can’t stand the big and thick default menu-item fonts like Ubuntu).

However, there’s one big impeding factor for me to make Linux Mint my primary computer: the packages repositories are one generation behind Ubuntu (the most widely supported distro)! Software often have bugs that the developers solved, living with old, ‘proven’ software slows down the iterative process.

I’ve been through hell trying to access Bitlocker volume with Linux Mint 20.1 as not only it doesn’t work right of the box like Windows, I’m stuck with a command line dislocker that doesn’t integrated with the file manager (like Nemo). The zuluCrypt available with Mint 20.1 is too old to support Bitlocker properly. Trying to upgrade it to 6.0 has Qt dependencies which is unsolvable. I was able to download the unsanctioned old revision in debian package but there’s more unsolvable dependencies.

The alternative option of compiling from the source is met with more dependencies fuckery and now the restrictive Mint repository might not have the exact version of the compiler required by the source code package. Aargh!

I was about to give up Linux Mint and install Ubuntu and try to hold my nose changing the desktop to Cinnamon. Luckily I’ve found somebody who read my mind: there’s Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix!

Not only Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix supported Bitlocker right out of the box (no need to fuck with zuluCrypt which doesn’t integrate with the file explorer anyway)! Most of the defaults make sense, buttons are often where I expect them to be. Even Win+P key works identically! The names/lingo are close to Windows whenever possible, and honestly the default Yari theme is visually slightly more pleasing than Windows as it makes very good use of the visual spaces!

Here’s a few transition tips

Windows Ubuntu/Cinnamon
WallpaperBackground
Device Manager(No equivalent) Install hardinfo for System Information
Task ManagerSystem monitor
Windows KeySuper Key
ShortcutLauncher
Lingo
Windows Linux
Foobar2000deadbeef
Notepad++notepadqq
Greenshotksnip
Apps and its near equivalents

I use Winsplit-Revolution in Windows (old version is freeware) that uses the numeric keypad to lock the window to the 9 squares grid using Ctrl+Alt+{Numpad 1-9}. Save the keyboard shortcuts in case if you want to install it again on another computer:

dconf dump /org/cinnamon/desktop/keybindings/ > dconf-settings.conf
dconf load /org/cinnamon/desktop/keybindings/ < dconf-settings.conf

There’s no Ctrl+Shift-Esc key which I often use to call Task Manager (called System monitor). I had to make the shortcut as well to feel at home.

WindowsLinux
(Explorer) Alt-D for address bar(Nemo) Ctrl+L

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System Engineers’ tip to HKCEE/HKALE Math and Physics

Shortly after I’ve graduated with Mathematics and Electrical (and Computer) Engineering degrees, I realized a few supposedly difficult topics in Hong Kong’s Mathematics and Physics (Electric Circuits) curriculum was taught in unnecessarily painful ways.

Here’s an article I’ve written to show that it is less work to teach secondary (high) school students a few easy-to-learn university math topics first than teaching them dumb and clumsy derivations/approaches to avoid the pre-requisitesHKDSE EE Tips

Here are the outline of the article

  • Complex numbers with Euler Formula
  • Trigonometric identities can be derived effortlessly using complex number than tricky geometric proofs
  • Inverting matrices using Gaussian elimination instead of messing with cofactors and determinants
  • Proper concepts of circuit analysis and shortcuts
  • Solving AC circuits in a breeze with complex numbers instead of remembering stupid rules like ELI and ICE rules and messy trigonometric identities.

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Holo Fans Club: 新世紀何老主義入門 (by 趙克倫) Introduction to Hololism - A New Philosophy for a New Century

Download: 新世紀何老主義入門

新 世 紀 何 老 主 義 入 門

INTRODUCTION TO HOLOLISM
A NEW PHILOSOPHY FOR A NEW CENTURY
ORIGINAL BY
THORIUM HOLMIUM (ThHo) SULPHATE
(B. SC, HKU; CERT ED., HKU)
(19XX-20XX)
EDITED BY: SMALL POTATOES (B. PH. SC, HORNS., HK(CEE)= 9U)

 

發憤啊!
CH 1 聖保羅冇希望啦! 你睇吓, 人哋寶翠園影名校影英皇, 聖類斯都唔影我哋呀!
CH 2 你哋俾啲心機啦!
CH 3 DON’T CRY OVER THE SPILT MILK
CH 4 A. MATHS 都係大家係度鬥背數
CH 5 你地自己搞掂啦
CH 6 YOU WILL HAVE 3 TESTS NEXT MONDAY AND TUESDAY
CH 7 冇人咁做㗎
CH 8 PEOPLE USUALLY DO IT LIKE THIS
CH 9 我趕住上堂㗎
CH 10 數學冇 MARKING 㗎
CH 11 攞到 A 都唔恭喜你
CH 12 最多俾多十分鐘你哋
結語 香港水平真係好差! (如果你會考 MATHS 同 A. MATHS 考到 A 返學校剝佢棚牙)

 

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Experimental Worldview Framework Desires x Problems x Mechanisms x Device

I am experimenting with a framework to summarize how I observe things that are going on around me, analyzing situations and coming up with solution approaches. Currently this is what I have:

{Desires} × {Problems} × {Mechanisms} × {Devices}

Everything I see can be analyzed as a result of the cross-product (a fancy word for combinations of contents) between these 4 broad categories. To make it easier to remember, they can be factored into 2 major categories:

{Questions} × {Answers}

Where obviously

  • [Questions] Desires (objectives) lead to problems (practicalities) to solve
  • [Answers] Mechanisms (abstract concepts) hosted by a device (implementation) to address questions

Why the cross product? By tabulating everything I learned or know in 4 columns (categories), I can always select a few of them (subset) and notice a lot of recurring themes (questions) and common solution approaches (answers). This corresponds to an old saying “there’s nothing new under the sun”.

Then what about innovations? Are we constantly creating something new? Yes, we still are, but if you look closely, there are very few ideas that are fundamentally new that cannot be synthesized by combining the old ones (sometimes recursively).

Let me use the framework itself as an example on how to apply this framework (yes, it’s recursive):

  • Desires: predict and understand many phenomenon
  • Problems: mental capacity is limited
  • Mechanisms: this framework (breaking observations into 4 categories)
  • Devices: tabulation (cross-products, order reduction)

Feedback as an example:

  • Desires: have good outcomes (or meet set objectives)
  • Problems: not there yet
  • Mechanism: take advantage of past data for future outputs (through correction)
  • Devices: feedback path (e.g. regulator or control systems.)

Feedforward as an example that shares a lot of properties as feedback:

  • Desires: have good outcomes (or meet set objectives)
  • Problems: not there yet
  • Mechanism: take advantage of past data for future outputs (through prediction)
  • Devices: predictor (e.g. algorithm or formula)

Abstraction as an example:

  • Desires: understand complexities (e.g. large code base)
  • Problems: limited mental capacity (programmers are humans after all)
  • Mechanism: abstraction (generic view grouping similar ideas together)
  • Devices: black-boxes (e.g. functions, classes)

Trade as an example:

  • Desires: improves utility (utility = happiness in economics lingo)
  • Problems: one cannot do everything on its own (limited capacity)
  • Mechanism: exchange competitive advantages
  • Devices: market (goods and services)

Business as an example:

  • Desires: improves utility (through trade)
  • Problems: need to offer something for trade
  • Mechanism: create value
  • Devices: operations

Money (and Markets) as two examples:

  • Desires: facilitate trade
  • Problems: difficult valuation and transfer through barter, decentralized
  • Mechanism: a common medium
  • Devices: money (currencies), markets (platform for trade)

Law as an example:

  • Desires: make the pie bigger by working cooperatively
  • Problems: every individual tries to maximize their own interest but mentally too limited to consider working together to grow the pie (pareto efficient solutions)
  • Mechanism: set rules and boundaries (I personally think it’s a sloppy patch fix that is way overused and way abused) and get everybody to buy it
  • Devices: law and enforcement

Religion as an example

  • Desires: coexist peacefully
  • Problems: irreconcilable differences
  • Mechanism: blind unverified trust (faith)
  • Devices: Deities and religion

Just with the examples above, many desires can be consolidated along the lines of making ourselves better off, and many problems can be consolidated along the lines of we’re too stupid. Of course it’s not everything, but it shows the power of tabulating into 4 categories and consolidating the parts into few unique themes.

I chose to abstract the framework into 4 broad categories instead of 2 because two are too simplified to be useful: since the framework is a way to organize (compactify) observations into manageable number of unique items, there will be too many distinct entries if I have only two categories. Nonetheless, I would refrain from having more than 7 categories because most humans cannot reason effectively with that many levels of nested for-loops (that’s what cross products boils down to).

I also separated desires from problems because I realized that way too often people (manager, clients, customers, government, etc.) ask the wrong question (because they narrowed it to the wrong problem) that leads to a lot of wasted work and frequent direction changes. People are too often asked to solve hard problems that turns out to be the wrong ones for fulfilling the motivating desires. Very few learn to trace it back to the source (desires) and find the correct problem to address, which often have easy solutions that’s more valuable to the requester than what was originally asked. This often leads to unhappy outcomes for everybody that’s avoidable. An emphasis on desires is one of my frequently used approaches to prevent these kind of mishaps.

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Title of this blog site

Initially I started with “TMI: Too Much Information” as the title of this blog, given that my plan was to put fragments of technical information or insights I came across that might be useful for solving problems. That means the blog posts contain more than what you want to know, unless you are looking to solve a specific problem with the help of the post or you are just outright nerdy.

But soon I realized I have some non-technical stuff like gags, music, and the technical stuff covers more than just electronic measurement instruments, so I need a title that’s less common and more catchy.

Today, I came across a reddit post, which user “llllIlllIllIlIRogue Sysadmin “says:

If you don’t they’ll just hear jargon and glaze over completely and not even try to follow you. If you draw a pretty layout of everything, though, they’ll make some token effort to follow along.

They’ll still get lost but now you’re not just a nerd rambling… you’re a rambling nerd with a plan.

Very catchy! Also, I liked the original comment because it covers:

  • Passion for geeky topics
  • It’s important to communicate well so that people will bother to follow what we have to say.

I did a google search with quotes “rambling nerd with a plan” and only one entry: the original post, showed up, so it’s not a commonly used phrase. I’ll take it 🙂

 1,191 total views